Sermon Dud

In my years of preaching I have developed files for my different sermons.  They are labeled by topics or series and I file them accordingly.  There is, however, a special file that no one else would ever notice.  It is the sermon dud file. 

As with any public speaker, I am sure they can testify that sometimes, you can tell the crowd connects, and that you connect with the crowd.  Other times you know you are getting across to people even though their response doesn’t show it.  Then there is the dud.  The dud is when you can’t wait until the sermon is over.  If the preacher can’t wait until it is over, the congregation must be even more anxious.  This is the dud sermon.  The one that I file in the dud file.  Another name for that file is “never preach this one again”.

Through the years, the file has grown but not too rapidly.  There may be some of the congregation who would like to suggest some for the dud file:)  But as a communicator it is important to connect with the crowd.  That means preaching something that people can use and learn from.  Furthermore, there is another thing that makes the sermon able to connect.  It has to connect with the preacher first.  If the message hasn’t impacted the preacher during preparation, it won’t impact the crowd.  Sermons shouldn’t just be written, but rather birthed within the heart of the preacher.

On the same line, I read a great story today of a preacher who had a dud.  this is from Mikey’s Funnies:

“They say that a preacher’s wife is always his number one assistant.

An example of this comes one Sunday morning after the preacher had just finished his sermon. He went and sat down with his wife and she asked him how he thought the church service went.

The Preacher shrugged and said, "The worship was excellent, and I think the prayer and communion times went quite well, but," he continued, "I just don’t think the sermon ever got off the ground."

The wife looked over at him, and before she could stop herself, she said, "Well, it sure did taxi long enough!"

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